Great networker? These are the professions you should be in

Great networker? These are the professions you should be in

New year, new career? Great at networking and want to do something with it? Or simply after a platform where you can improve your networking skills? There are at least six professions you should consider.   Public relations Publicists are the networkers par excellence. In order to have journalists write about their brands, publicists have to do much more than simply writing press releases: they have to build relationships and nurture them by carefully selecting whom they want to share which pieces of news with. Pretty often, they even go as far as spoiling journalists with luxurious events and gadgets!   Journalist It goes without saying that journalists build relationships with publicists. Moreover, almost like detectives, they talk with anybody who can provide them with hot news. If you want to make friends with a journalist, make sure you dispose of information nobody else has, and you are delivering only to them, on time and to the point. They will love you forever!   Event Manager People in this role coordinate a variety of stakeholders: companies, organisations, venues, caterers, technicians, musicians, guests and the media. Every event happens only once, so it’s unique. This involves a different concept every time, and thus always different people collaborating. Therefore, the network of event managers is constantly expanding.   Venue manager Venue managers collaborate a lot with event managers and all the other above-mentioned professionals. Also, they constantly deal with customers, some changing every day and some being regular guests. Venue managers will especially build relationships with the latter, but with their socials skills they will try to persuade the former to...

Strategise your networking for 2016

Feel your need to become more strategic in your networking efforts? Relationship management system Contactually argues you should make networking strategy one of your New Year’s resolutions. In a recent webinar, CEO Zvi Band presented a powerful roadmap to strategise your relationships in 2016. This action plan is composed of three steps, each one driven by a question you want to ask yourself.   1) What are my goals? What is it you wish to achieve through networking this year? You probably have several goals, in different areas of your life. Write them all down, and then look at them: which ones have priority? Make sure you don’t choose more than two or three goals, as each one of them will involve a whole project. I recommend two: one in your career, one in your private life. Lastly, make sure the goals you set follow the SMART criteria.   2) What kind of people can get me there? Serendipity is extremely powerful in networking, but when it comes to achieving specific goals we need targeted measures. So let’s get analytical: what kind of people can help you attain that goal? Say you wish to double your business as a graphic designer for small-sized enterprises. The categories of people that will benefit you will be for instance your existing customers (who can refer you), other marketing and communications professionals (who can ask you to take care of design in multidisciplinary projects) and entrepreneurs (your potential clients).   3) Who do I already know from this category? Now, for every group you have identified list ten to twenty people you already know....

On Reciprocity, Networking Karma and Universal Compassion

When I give talks about networking, I usually start with the concept of reciprocity. Reciprocity means “give and take”. In other words, how can we expect something if we’re not willing to give it? Therefore, we should give first and expect second.   This is what most networking theorists claim.   Yet you can go a step further and say that your shouldn’t even expect from the specific people you made a favour to. Just give in general, and something will come back. Perhaps not from those very people, but from your network. Call it networking karma.   This is what the almost complete rest of networking theorists will tell you.   What almost nobody will tell you is that you shouldn’t expect at all. That you should give regardless of what comes back. “Why should I do so?!”, you’ll go. “Because you genuinely like people”, I’ll answer.   There are two main reasons why should like people. The first one is that every person is interesting. If you think a certain person is boring, it’s because you didn’t ask them the right questions. Each and every person is unique, and can teach you something. And you can add value to each and every person’s life.   The second reason you should like people is that, at the end of the day, we are all human, and we are all just trying to get by. Call it universal compassion.   “Man is by nature a social animal; an individual who is unsocial naturally and not accidentally is either beneath our notice or more than human. Society is something that precedes the individual.” – Aristotle   Before they come see me,...